Venous Needle dislodgement

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Venous Needle dislodgement

Gerry Boyle
During recent Patient Safety discussion this was brought up ART have been asked to assess and collate how dialysis clinics deal with the risk of venous dislodgement.   The question is whether we look for a technology solution to monitor dislodgement or look to increase frequency of nurses observations.  

I think it is unlikely that we could recommend an increase in obs frequency.

If we are to use some of the high-end technology and it was used for each patient at each dialysis session it would cost approx £10 million per annum across the UK (£3.50 per session, 20,000 UK patients, thrice weekly)

Alternative low-tech of enuresis pad, re-usable, but being used in an way that it was not designed for

Please add comments and discuss.

Gerry
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Re: Venous Needle dislodgement

Ian Wilde
Administrator
Hi Gerry,

I know that we don't have any technology in use here in Manchester to monitor needle dislodgement.  Our machines (5008) have the ability to use some though if we perhaps had a difficult patient or if it was needed for the patient's own piece of mind should they wish.  

I will look into finding our policy details though...

Ian
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Re: Venous Needle dislodgement

Gerry Boyle
Hi Ian,
We have 5008 and one 5008 S with VenAcc in unit, though we use VenAcc at home in our managed service program.   Venacc tends not to be used in unit and we rely on the enusesis pads.
Let me know what you thinkk of the VenAcc on the FMC 5008 S
Cheers, Gerry
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Re: Venous Needle dislodgement

Lynda Smith
Hi Gerry,

Personally I think there's nothing better than assessing your patients regularly, each hour is what we advocate, together with correct taping technique. The other thing is use of blood sensor alarms in high risk, nocturnal or home patients. A Scottish Unit I know actually uses them in all their patients. We have been recently evaluating the Hemodialert alarm and it evaluated well by both patients and staff. We also undertake a VND Risk Assessment on each of our patients.

Best regards

Lynda